Copyright, London and Wombles

written copyright symbol

They are giving away walking maps at Euston for the Olympics. Most punters chose the underground. I am not a Womble, so I walked to the venue for CILIP’s Executive Briefing; eCopyright for Libraries and Archives. 
It was worth getting wet.

There are few things as complex as the current UK copyright landscape and
Nick Poole’s keynote presentation confirmed this. Commenting upon recent UK and EU issues, he stated that there was no certainty in any proposed recommendations. This included the government commissioned Hargreaves Review of IP and Growth. Lobbying and responding to any calls for evidence was advocated to protect the positions of both libraries and archives.
Maybe I am part of an underground movement after all? 

This stance was also championed by
Naomi Korn in her more in depth look at Hargreaves. She talked about the speed of technological change in comparison to that of legislative; the nebulosity of the proposed Digital Copyright Exchange; that there were over 50 million orphan works across sectors and there will be no safeguards to educational exceptions whilst they are not protected by legal measures.

Ben White, Head of Intellectual Property at the British Library concentrated on orphan works. Here there is still discussion to be had about the definition and understanding of the issues surrounding these types of work. We will hopefully see a White Paper this year.

Emily Goodhand gave us an IP Case Law Update. This is always useful for interpreting fair dealing. We were given an overview of the UK legal system and she commented upon the recent NLA v Meltwater/PRCA case where as little as 11 words mattered when it came to a claim regarding copyright.

Georgia Angelaki, Business and Policy Development Coordinator, Europeana talked about the importance of standards and the project’s approach to open content licensing.

Heather Caven and Roxanne Peters outlined  a more efficient and holistic approach to rights management at the V&A. This is an attempt to mitigate clearance of rights processes.  In the past it has taken 35 working days to clear 1150 rights for 850 posters (the example that they used). They emphasised the need to be proactive, get senior level championship and match your work practice to the policy of the institution.
What is the copyright policy of your institution?

Sustainability of digital resources was the topic presented by Sarah Fahmy from The Strategic Content Alliance. The key to which is the IP that you own.

Did I say that it was a packed day?

On my return walk to Euston, a man flew past me holding onto a map the size of a small car. The latter must have got caught on the wind.  A walking map perhaps?  A sticking plaster approach to a much larger problem?  Not exactly fit for purpose much the same as current copyright policy.  At Euston, a man on his phone told a caller that he was at King’s Cross; evidently he was as bemused as I. Even so, I hope to do the right thing when it comes to clearing rights.

Just like Orinoco in fact, maybe I am a Womble after all…. now where did I put that felt hat?

eCopyLite Twitter or You may find yourself…*

A4 File BindersThe world of copyright has notched up a gear recently. It’s getting a lot of press and there are many moves mooted. The Hargreaves’ Report has been significant in generating discussion, particularly with the Intellectual Property Office (IPO)  petitioning for copyright consultation with regard to the proposals. Many groups have posted their responses on the web; an example of which is the Libraries and Archives Copyright Alliance (LACA). Ploughing through 114 questions (none of them tick box) wasn’t something that I had ever envisaged doing but I responded. How did I get here? *

Increasing moves towards electronic services and improving their accessibility means that copyright is becoming more of an issue for the eLibrary team‘s Digital Library Officers. It is certainly taking up more of our time. The eCopyLite Twitter account is an attempt at keeping abreast of current events and tweeting those that may be relevant to staff and students. Without it, we probably wouldn’t have taken a once in a lifetime* chance to shape the future of copyright. With regard to the resulting legislation, our job will still be about balancing expectation against what can be delivered. In terms of librarianship that is the same as it ever was*.

*acknowledgement: Talking Heads, Once in a Lifetime .